Cambridge high rise has combustible cladding

7 August 2019

An investigation discovered that The Belvedere Tower in Cambridge, an 11 storey privately owned block, is ‘understood to comprise 75 per cent ACM cladding’.

Cambridge Independent reported on the findings, revealed by a freedom of information request, which outlined that the tower is ‘understood’ to comprise around 75% aluminium composite material (ACM) cladding. The news outlet stated that the building is ‘the only high rise in the city known to the council’ to have ACM, with council residential team manager for environmental services Claire Adelizzi responding that ‘additional interim fire safety measures are in place’.

In turn, she added that the ‘long-term plan is currently progressing regarding removal of the cladding and replacement with an alternative non-combustible material’. The council also confirmed that the building’s management company is compiling an application to the government for funding to removal the cladding, though ‘no date was specified’.

Cambridgeshire Fire and Rescue Service has ‘not previously’ named the buildings in the county that have ACM cladding, but stated that residents ‘have been made aware’, while the building’s owner and management company had been contacted, but ‘no response has yet been received’.

Ms Adelizzi added: ‘Since Grenfell, Cambridge City Council have been working in partnership with Cambridgeshire Fire & Rescue Service as well as the building management company and leasehold board of directors for this building within the city to ensure that adequate additional interim fire safety measures are in place and that these are being adequately managed and maintained, which is the case.

‘We have sought and have been provided with regular updates regarding progress towards the long-term plan of removal and replacement of the cladding in line with the government’s requirement in relation to this in terms of high-rise buildings such as this.

‘I understand that the long-term plan is currently progressing regarding removal of the cladding and replacement with an alternative non-combustible material and that as part of this the building management company and leasehold board of directors are compiling their application to government in terms of allocation of funding towards the overall cost of these works.

‘As well as the involvement of environmental services and Cambridgeshire Fire & Rescue Service, consultation is also being made with planning and building control.’

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Cambridge high rise has combustible cladding